Lunar Egg Challenge…Final Drop- Part III

moonorbust           DSC_0055

The final day of the project finally came and the whole school knew we were doing our egg drop. We had a lot of visitors the day of the drop. Each class would drop their landers,   roll their rovers down a ramp, while measuring the distance the rover traveled.

rampweb

I think I forgot to mention in previous entries, part of the student’s problem was to build a rover that would carry an egg safely down a ramp. The distance the rover would travel would add points to their score. We were scoring the projects by the rubric I posted in the last entry. This included whether the egg broke or cracked  points would be deducted if this happened.

The drop went well and we had one group do a great job on their rover going over 170 cm in distance. As for the eggs, It was split down the middle, some groups had their eggs crack or break. However, there were a good many that survived the drop. Overall, the students did a good job on their designs and had fun doing it.

As with all projects, Ms. Melcher and I sat down to talk about the components we would change or hopefully improve upon. Part of the process includes giving the students a formative assessment to find out what they did learn from the project. We agreed this might be something to do or actually have students complete step 8 in the packet.  Step 8 in the engineering design packet has students creating presentations about their designs. This could be an option for another part of the grade for the project. Students wouldn’t have to present, but would create this part as a mini report. Just a couple of ideas. We did agree that we would prefer smaller groups, large groups didn’t allow for everyone to be involved in the process.  Otherwise most of the project went well. We have already started collecting martials for next year.

Advertisements

About rippie77

Science Teacher at Cardinal Gibbons High School, Raleigh NC.

Posted on February 12, 2013, in Labs, NASA, NASA explorers school, Project, Space Camp, STEM. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: