Category Archives: Teacher Ideas

List of 500+ Fun, Cool and Interesting Words — Authentic Teacher

Originally posted on Writing for Kids (While Raising Them): All writers love language. And we especially love fun words, don’t we? Some have funky spellings, tongue-twisting turns, a satisfying “ooh”…and some sound too hilarious to be true! So I’ve put together a list of favorite fun words that I’ll add to periodically. Have fun, lexicon lovers!…

via List of 500+ Fun, Cool and Interesting Words — Authentic Teacher

This is a really cool idea, but I would put a spin on this. maybe s science spin, using science words.

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It’s Rover Time!

In this blog post I’m going to talk about a “mission” we are in the process of completing. We are building drum roll please…the Mars Rover, yep you heard me. An open source build developed by @JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory Open Source Rover) I came across the build one day when I received a newsletter from NASA and it had a bit of a blurb about a Mars Rover.  I went to the website and find out about it. It looked interesting and a great learning opportunity.  I thought this might be something that we could do here at school. Since I’m involved with the robotics team, it seemed this could be a good fit. So, I emailed our Mentor, Head Coach and Biggest Supporter. You name it, he’s an all-around total support and leader of the robotics team. I e-mailed him the website and information. I’m not kidding within next 24 hours he sent me an email telling me it was possible with a list of all the parts and cost. Amazing right, well he was as excited as I was to do this.

I gathered all the information needed and decided to approach our Principal. I stated my case by promoting the “mission” as a great community opportunity especially once the Rover was built.  It could really be used to bring in tons of other people and the Rover could be used for other club’s activities. While being a great teaching tool. He thought it was a good idea. And after a long talk with him he funded our project. We are planning on a ton of things to do. Once our Principal gave us the go, we started to order the parts and had a meeting. The Rover team right now consists of students from Physics club (@physics_cghsnc ), Gibbons Robotics (@robotics_cghsnc) and Space Explorers Club (@spaceexp_cghsnc). The group mainly has students from the Physics Club. Two members come to mind Peter and Mihir. Both have done an outstanding job working on this project. I can’t begin to tell you how much their leadership is appreciated.

So, this began our project two months ago. Check out the pictures from the beginning. It all started with having to inventory all the parts. The whole Rover has about 400 parts, if not more. Once that was finished we needed to manufacturer some parts. This is where our maker room came in handy.

For now, I’ll end here, because I could go on forever. The excitement around the Rover is building and hopefully we will have a fully functional Mars Rover by Thanksgiving. I’ll keep up with the posts. My next one will go over the good and bad we have faced since the beginning.

10 tips I wish I knew as a First Year Teacher | Authentic Teacher Audioblog Episode 18 — Authentic Teacher

10 tips I wish I knew when I first started teaching way back in 2003 or even sooner!

via 10 tips I wish I knew as a First Year Teacher | Authentic Teacher Audioblog Episode 18 — Authentic Teacher

NatGeo Educators

Student Work

Recently I was honored to be interviewed for the NatGeo Educator Spotlight. They interviewed me about my capstone I did for them on their certification. You can read about their certification National Geographic Certification.  I’m always a bit hesitant of being interviewed, but it turned out okay and I’m happy to have shared my project with everyone.

Now for the project I’m not sure if I did write about the project in the past. But as you read through the interview you will get an idea what’s about. I used the Book reading project we do in class and integrated the maps from National Geographic. During the year I give a book reading project, students in class read Rocket Boys and Hidden Figures. Two great books by the way. Students are given a schedule for reading, I would recommend this, I found it helpful for the students. My sophomores knew exactly what pages they had to have done by a certain date. Feedback from students indicated this kept them on track, even for my Honors class.

Rocket Boys Book Project

When completing their reading they had to answer questions on a google form and then they were to create a presentation answering the questions posted on the assignment sheet. I changed things up a bit, by choosing different groups to present after each section was completed. I decided the year after I had implemented this project, I would adjust it and assign the “Hidden Figures” book. Last year was the first year we did both books. The only changes I’m going to make for next  year is I will assign this project in the 2nd Semester. I’m flipping the Genius Hour project with this project.

West Virg

To enhance the Rocket Boys Project I used National Geographic Maps and Mapmaker.  Basically the goal of the lesson was to get students to understand the different resources (geological)  in each state. Using the maps the students needed to create a legend and indicate on the maps the resources and geology of the states. During the activity we highlighted West Virginia and Coal Mining. Integrating some of the readings from Rocket Boys. They also learned about their own state and its resources.  Feedback from the students was great, they gave some ideas on how to improve the activity.  

The project was my capstone for the certification. I would recommend the program to anyone who would like to become a part of the NatGeo Education community.

For those of you who are interested here are the National Standards I addressed with this project: HS-ESS3-1 Earth and Human Activity and HS-ESS3-3 Earth and Human Activity.

National Geographic Education Twitter: @NatGeoEducation

 

Up, Up and Away

 

An amazing opportunity was presented to us when a parent offered to help launch a weather balloon for our school. I’ve been trying to do this for a long time. When the student came forward and offered to have his father work with us I jumped at the chance.  Awesome! That is all I could think. What an educational opportunity for my students. Plus, it fit in with the curriculum that I was teaching in class; meteorology. It also was an event the whole school could take part in. Which did happen.

The launch was sponsored by the Science Department and Space Explorers Club. Once we had our launch date, Earth Day, one of our students created a mission patch for the event. Using the mission patch we created buttons to hand out at Earth Day. I then had a student create our payload, he 3D printed the Banner for our Astronaut. It was a great opportunity to get students involved in the event.

So it didn’t go as planned, launch day had to be rescheduled due to weather. So we decided to launch the week after. And that was probably a good idea because the landing predictor had the balloon heading towards the coast, it seems the Jet Stream was pretty fast that day.  Below you see the comparison between the predicted and actual path of the balloon. After launch we tracked the balloon to Pine Level, NC.

The balloon reached 92,000 ft, something we didn’t expect. Part of the payload were two PocketLabs, one we had taking readings of altitude and accelerometer.  The other measured all the weather variables. You can find some of the information in the Google Folder.  A video was made to commemorate the event,  2018 Balloon Launch. 

Overall the event went well, but we are going to have to fix a couple of things. First the PocketLabs can record over 30,000 data points. Problem is that we didn’t set the sensors to take 1 reading per 2 or 5 minutes. Instead it took readings every half second. So it shut down too early. So reminder, change data point readings. Second, the Samsung 360 settings have to change so it can record better footage for stitching. Here is the final version of the 360 footage. And finally, we are going to let this be a student driven event. Meaning we are going to allow the students to pretty much take over the launch.

It was a great educational opportunity and we plan on having another launch next year.

Designing Group Projects So That Everyone Participates – John Spencer

Collaborative projects can easily fall apart in the classroom. You start with a great idea but next thing you know, you have half of your students checked out. So, how do we fix this?   Listen to

Source: Designing Group Projects So That Everyone Participates – John Spencer

After listening to the podcasts I’m rethinking my group projects. How do you get all parties involved in the project? Buy in? How do you get students to own the process? John Spencer does a great job in giving teachers ideas how how to do this. But obviously each classroom is different, and something that works for me might not work for you. And there will always be that one or two students you just can’t get to work. Its frustrating I know, but its one of the things Teachers have to accept, its called “human behavior” (well that’s what I think). The classroom can’t be perfect.

 “It’s complicated, John Spencer says and its because kids are complicated”.

I know the projects that are successful in my classroom are the one’s that students are engaged and have ownership. “Creative Collaboration”, definitely agree here with John Spencer. Our earthquake towers are one of the most successful projects we do in class. Students take ownership and work together on building something.

I’m definitely taking some of John Spencer’s suggestions and implementing them in the some of my projects in class.

Thank You Mr. Spencer great article!

 

Finally a successful Genius Hour

Yes, this topic has become a major point in many academic discussions lately I just recently attended a webinar with AJ Juliani who is a guru of the Genius Hour.  It was mentioned at my school recently during a faculty meeting and I found out another teacher was using the project format.  This really got me pumped because I have been the only one doing this project for the past 2 years. My version of the Project’s a little different but after looking at other teacher’s blogs and some of the resources on Genius Hour I started to realize that I am on the right course with it. This is my introduction to last year’s Genius Hour which was a great time for the kids I believe.  I think most of the students were engaged in their task and most of the students enjoyed their projects. Sorry for such a delay with the blog post, but it’s been a busy summer and beginning of the year.

Last year’s Genius Hour went well, because of student’s choices for the project, they were part of the success. Some of them decided instead of creating and solving a problem, they would help gather data and research their topics.  So, what they did was they joined citizen science projects.  At first, I was a little leery of this because I thought this really isn’t the purpose of Genius Hour but this is what they were interested in and what they wanted to do so I allowed it to happen.  One young man got involved with North Carolinas Critter cameras which I thought was great idea, he applied for a critter camera and when he set it up he started to help with research, sending photos in to scientists.  He was so enthusiastic about this project and at the end when he presented his enthusiasm just overflowed. The student thought it was such a great project that he is continuing to do it even beyond finishing the Genius Hour project.  After presenting there were some students who got really excited too and wanted to know more about the project.  I know it was not problem solving or creating something to solve a problem. But it was helping scientists and I was happy I let him do it.  No regrets.

The second project I wanted to mention was completed by a young woman. She came to me and she was fretting about the project. Her concern was that she was not a science person. I asked her what was she interested in and this initiated a discussion on what would she might like to do.  My guidelines required that the project only needed to be within the area of science technology engineering or art.  We started to discuss the project and I told her to think about. She came back the next day with this idea to create an alien world and alien race with the knowledge that she obtained from biology and other Science courses. Her project was amazing, she created a new alien race and the planet they lived on. I’ve inserted some of the pictures of her alien and some of the worksheets.

I was amazed at the detail she put into her creation. She told me she was so excited about this and she felt that it was something she would love to continue. I told her I thought that was fantastic and that maybe she could find somebody to write a story around the alien.  The student thought that was an awesome idea and over the summer we kept in contact.  I continued to receive updates on her progress during the summer.

I think this is a great example of what Genius Hour is about. The excitement afterwards with some of these projects really made me understand how important it was to give students their learning back.  Putting learning back into the student’s hands has become a goal of mine this year. The combination of Genius Hour and Blended Learning, has been successful in implementing this goal. I think the success of the Genius Hour Project last year, has driven me to improve the project.  I won’t change much however, I will allow a bit more leeway on their topics and see what comes of it. I did do a journal last year to try to keep an eye on how they were doing. I found that it kept them on task and could be used as evidence of their learning.  I’m already planning the next one for the 2nd semester.

Freedom to Learn — User Generated Education

I was painfully bored during my K-12 education. I looked forward to college anticipating that it would be different – more engaging, more interesting, more innovative. I was wrong. My undergraduate education, except for a few bright spots, was just an extension of my K-12 education including more grill and drill with sages on the […]

via Freedom to Learn — User Generated Education

Below are just a couple of quotes from the blog post that I truly appreciate. I’m not interested in reading this book. Carl Rogers, Freedom to Learn.

Much significant learning is acquired through doing. “Placing the student in direct experiential confrontation with practical problems, social problems, ethical and philosophical problems, personal issues, and research problems, is one of the most effective modes of promoting learning” (p. 162).

One cannot measure the difference in attitude, the increased interest, the growing pride in self-improvement, but one is aware that they exist. (Rogers, 1969, p. 19)

Part II “5 Summer Secrets…”

5 Summer Secrets to a stress- free fall

This is a continuation from the previous post.

5 summer stress free secrets include tools to help you make a plan to complete tasks during the summer that will make your year less stressful. An example, the first question the challenge or plan asks is “What do you want your life to like when school starts again? So, what do I want my life to look like when school starts again? Good question. Well stress free of course.  I wanted to have first quarter ready to go, or my plans completed. I want to be prepared. When we get back to school I always feel like I’m not prepared for school.

So to keep up with this vision and Ms. Watson’s challenge for the summer, I signed up for email notifications. Her 5 Summer Secrets started with number one “Eliminate unintentional breaks”. This is common sense, meaning be to be more productive you must task manage. By straying from your work, you create an environment that wastes time and you don’t complete your tasks. Sounds familiar, yep sounds like the kids. Keep them on task. Well what about the teachers? I  find myself doing this especially during the school day.  I start one project and end up straying from that task, going down a rabbit hole as they say. Eventually that project takes me a lot longer.  According Angela Watson we take unintentional breaks. So, she talks about how you need set a break later and work for a good amount time doing one thing. An example is I’ve decided that I should work through my planning period grading  and not go off on a tangent doing something else. Hopefully this will give me some solid time to complete some tasks.

Second  “secret” is avoid “task-Switching”.  Work ahead and avoid task-switching, which I’ve caught myself doing many times. You need to batch together similar tasks and stay on task. Don’t allow yourself to stray from those tasks. Again, sound familiar. I find there are times where I’m working on something, I’ll stray away and go on to something else. So, what happens I’m unproductive and end up not getting what I need done. Seems all commons sense right? well then why do we end up not following that common sense. Got me, but I tried to correct that this summer.

The third “secret”, use scheduling to create your boundaries around time. I found this to be very helpful. I scheduled different tasks I needed to get done during the summer on certain days and hours. When I did this, and followed the plan I got a ton of stuff done. For example, on Tuesday and Wednesday mornings I would work on lesson plans. When I kept to the plan it worked and I got a lot things done. Once I strayed from the plan, well let’s just say very little got done.

Number Four on the list is “Figure out the main thing and do it first”. So, what is the most important or main thing you need to get done this summer. Or, which is the most urgent and an overwhelmingly large task that you need to do.  My main task would be my lesson plans and activities. I know, summer is almost over, but this does work during the year also. The most important tasks need to be done first. Make a list, put the most important at the top of the list.

The last secret is to look “for innovative ways to relax any standards that create unnecessary work”. Look for ways to make things easier on yourself this year. Relax and say no to unnecessary work. Look for activities or assignments from another teacher. Adapt them to your class but don’t reinvent the wheel. If something didn’t work last year, then change it to suit your class, or don’t do the assignment. With this one I have a tendency to create an assignment that is a lot more intricate then has to be. More work for me. Simplify things, let the students take control of their learning. This is where Blended Learning and Flipped Learning comes in. Collaborate with another teacher to make things a bit easier on yourself. All good advice, that I sometimes must admit I forget.

When I followed this advice, I felt good about the beginning of the year. I still do even though I strayed a bit. This is great advice and does work. Try it. I know the summer is coming to an end, but some of this can still be done during the year. I would advise you subscribe to Ms. Watson’s newsletter and podcasts, she really does have some great advice.

Anglea Watson The Cornerstone for teachers